Have you ever wondered, but not wanted to ask, why the optometrist asks all those questions or what certain tests are for?

Hopefully you will find the answers here. If you can’t find the answer here or anywhere else on the website please email us on and we will do our best to answer your question.

EYE EXAMINATION FAQ

  1. Why do you need to see my previous spectacles?
  2. Why do you ask about previous eye problems?
  3. What has my general health got to do with my eyes?
  4. Why do you need to know what medication I am taking?
  5. Why do you ask about my job?
  6. Why do you need to know what my hobbies are?
  7. What are you looking for when you shine the light into my eyes?
  8. What is the pressure test for?
  9. What is the test with all the flashing dots for?
  10. What do things that happened when I was a child have to do with my eyes now?
  11. What have family eye & health problems got to do with my eyesight?
  12. What are you doing when you flip the lenses and ask “is it better with 1 or 2?” ?
  13. What are the red and green circles for?
  14. Why are some of the lenses in different coloured holders?
  15. Why do you want a photograph of the back of my eyes?
  16. Why do I need a copy of my prescription?
  17. How often should I have my eyes tested?
  18. I can see perfectly, why should I have my eyes tested?
  19. Why do my children need their eyes tested? They have an eye test at school don’t they?
  20. Why have I been told that I have dry eyes when they are watering all the time?

CONTACT LENS FAQ

  1. I want contact lenses. Why do I need a different examination?
  2. Why can’t I just buy lenses off the internet?
  3. Can I wear my contact lenses in the swimming pool?
  4. Can I sleep in my contact lenses?
  5. Why can’t I use a cheaper contact lens solution from the supermarket?
  6. Why shouldn’t I use my friend’s coloured contact lenses?
  7. My eyes are red, is it safe to put my lenses in?

SPECTACLE FAQ

  1. Can I have Reactolite lenses for driving?
  2. Why can’t I see TV in my reading glasses?
  3. Why can’t I read in my normal everyday glasses?
  4. What are varifocal lenses?
  5. What are bifocal lenses?
  6. Why do I need reading glasses but not distance glasses?
  7. Can I wear ready made reading glasses from the local shop?
  8. Why can’t I see the computer screen with my reading glasses?

EYE EXAMINATION FAQ - Answers

(1) Why do you need to see my previous spectacles?

There are several reasons why it is useful for us to examine and measure your previous spectacles, especially if it is the first time you have been to our practice. Here are a few of the key reasons.

We can only advise if your prescription has changed if we know what you are already wearing. If you do not have your last written prescription we can measure your spectacles to gain this information

If you are experiencing glare problems it could be because your lenses are scratched. You may not be able to see these scratches if you cannot see clearly without the spectacles on.

If you are wearing varifocal lenses we may be able to identify the make of lens so that we can use the same type. This is especially important if you have been having difficulties with your varifocals as a different make could solve the problems. Not all varifocals are equal!

If you have had difficulties with your spectacles we can assess the position and fit of them to see if this is the cause of the discomfort.

(2) Why do you ask about previous eye problems?

We need to know this in order to avoid unnecessary referral to the doctor or hospital.

We will ask if you have had any accidents or injuries to your eyes, or if you have ever had any treatment on them. This includes any treatment you may have had as a child.

If you had a squint operation as a child, or had to wear an eye patch or do exercises, then you may have poor vision in one eye. If we find poor vision and we did not know your history we would be concerned by this finding. If we know that you have a lazy eye then we know that it is normal for you.

If you had an injury that could have left a scar then we will know what it is we are looking at. If we have no explanation to account for a scar or damage then we may refer you.

Some injuries can cause problems many years after the initial injury has healed. For example a bad blow to the eye can cause traumatic cataract decades later.

A recent injury to the eye could cause damage that you may not be aware of.

Some forms of surgery mean that we have to be particularly careful about what examinations we perform.

(3) What has my general health got to do with my eyes?

The short answer is “everything”

Many health problems can cause visual problems. If you are having problems with your eyes or your vision we can often link that to a health problem.

A few examples of eye / health links are listed below but this is by no means an exhaustive list.

Rheumatoid arthritis – Dry eyes

Diabetes – Variable and / or blurred vision

Migraine – Visual disturbances

Head injuries – double / blurred vision

Sinusitis – pain around the eyes

High Blood Pressure – leaky blood vessels in the back of the eye

Menopause – Tear problems leading to dry eye and / or blurry vision

(4) Why do you need to know what medication I am taking?

All medication has the potential to cause unwanted side effects in some people.(Have a look at the list of potential side effects listed on the sheet in a box of Paracetamol – it makes you wonder if getting rid of a headache is really worth the risk!)

Some medicines and tablets are known to cause specific ocular side effects.

They are too numerous to list here but the information is always written on the sheet of paper accompanying your tablets. We need to know what you are taking so that we know which side effects you may be experiencing.

Some medication comes with specific ocular warnings meaning that more regular examinations are recommended whilst you are taking it.

For example;

Prolonged high doses of steroids and some anti malarial tablets require frequent eye examinations as complications must be spotted as early as possible.

(5) Why do you ask about my job?

Knowing what job you do tells us how you use your eyes.

Different people have different visual requirements and will need different solutions to their visual problems. We can only give the correct advice on what spectacles or contact lenses will suit you best if we know what you need them to do.

For example;

A landscape gardener will need good protection against UV to prevent damage to the eyes, but may not need very good vision close up

An office worker will need good close up vision and may need specific computer spectacles, but may not be too bothered about their distance vision whilst they are in the office.

Decorators, plumbers and carpenters often find that varifocal lenses are no good at work because they are not always able to look through the correct part of the lens to see close up.

Bifocals can make going up and down ladders difficult so may not be suitable for roofers and builders.

(6) Why do you need to know what my hobbies are?

This is similar to why we need to know what job you do.

If we know what you want from your vision correction we can give you the best advice.

For example

Golf – Bifocals and varifocals can interfere with the correct head position needed for a good swing. Golfers often prefer separate distance spectacles or contact lenses for playing.

Team Sports – Spectacles are not a good idea on the pitch so contact lenses or protective goggles would be a better solution.

Racquet Sports – It is not easy to follow a ball accurately with bifocals or varifocals so contact lenses or separate distance spectacles are often much better. Squash balls are just big enough to fit into the eye socket and can do massive damage to the eyes, so protective goggles are available and recommended.

Swimming – prescription goggles are available so you can see what is going on around you at the pool.

Painting / Drawing – Reading glasses are often focussed too close for painting and drawing. Spectacles or contact lenses can be focussed to take this different working distance into account.

Model making – this often requires very small detailed work held much closer than a book or magazine. Stronger spectacles focussed exactly where you want to hold your work can make this much easier.

(7) What are you looking for when you shine the light in my eyes?

We are looking at the health of your eyes.

We make sure that your pupils are reacting to light as they should do.

We look at the front of your eyes to make sure that they are normal.

We check to see if you have any cataract or other similar problems.

We look at the retina to make sure that it is healthy and normal.

We can also take a photograph of the retina which is a much better way of recording the health of your eyes. We can compare photographs at each visit and make sure that nothing has changed.

(8) What is the pressure test for?

This is one of the tests for glaucoma.

The eyes are filled with fluid which stops them from collapsing. Some of this fluid is constantly produced and drained away. If this mechanism is faulty the pressure in the eye can rise and can cause damage to the nerves. This leads to sight loss and, if this happens, it is called glaucoma. High pressure does not always lead to glaucoma but needs to be monitored regularly.

Moderate high pressure does not cause any symptoms so you would not necessarily know that you had a problem. This is why we recommend regular eye examinations.

Some other conditions can cause the pressure to fall below a healthy level.

(9) What is the test with all the flashing dots for?

This is called a field test and is used to test your peripheral vision.

Peripheral vision means what you see “off to the edges” rather than straight ahead.

It is this peripheral vision that is damaged by glaucoma. It is therefore one of the tests used to determine if someone is developing glaucoma.

You would not necessarily notice a loss of peripheral vision as it often happens slowly, and humans are very adaptable creatures.

Glaucoma is not the only cause of peripheral vision loss. Other causes include Stroke, eye injury, haemorrhages and tumours.

If we do a field test it does not necessarily mean that we think you have any of these conditions. It is done routinely as part of a normal eye examination, although you may not have it done every time.

Migraine can also cause temporary loss of peripheral vision.

(10) What do things that happened as a child have to do with my eyes now?

Accidents or injuries as a child can leave scars which will be visible to an optometrist for the rest of your life. If we know what caused them we do not have to worry. If we don’t know what caused them we might refer you to the hospital unnecessarily.

Wearing spectacles or a patch, or having to do eye exercises as a child, tells us that you might have a lazy eye. If we find that the vision in one eye is worse than the other and cannot be corrected we need to know why. If we do not know your history we may refer you unnecessarily.

(11) What have family eye & health problems got to do with my eyesight?

Lots of eye conditions run in the family, as do lots of health problems.

If you have close relative with glaucoma, early cataract or age related macula degeneration you may be more at risk of developing it yourself. We will therefore recommend more frequent eye examinations.

If you have a family history of diabetes or heart problems you may be more at risk from these conditions. We can look out for specific changes in your eyes which might tell us that you are developing the condition. Early detection of these problems means that you stay healthier for longer and the eyes an often tell us that a problem has occurred before you even get any symptoms.

(13) What are the red and green circles for?

This is a test to make sure that the final prescription is balanced.

If the circles on the red are much clearer you may find that distance vision is not very good.

If the circles on the green are much clearer you may find that your close vision is not very good.

It is not always possible to balance the colours perfectly and we will leave one colour clearer depending on what the final spectacles or contact lenses are to be used for.

Some people find this test very difficult but this does not mean that your spectacles will be wrong. We have other methods of making sure that you get the best correction for your eyes.

(14) Why are some of the lenses in different coloured holders?

One set of lenses is used to correct for short sightedness and one for long sightedness. The colour coding is simply to make identification easier for the optometrist.

You may have a combination of different coloured holders if you have astigmatism.

Not all lens sets have the same colour coding so do not be alarmed if your previous optometrist used one colour and we use another.

(15) Why do you want a photograph of the back of my eyes?

“A picture tells a thousand words”

A photograph is a much better record of the health of your eyes than a written record. If we see you regularly we can compare current photographs with old ones and any changes are immediately obvious.

The photographs also give us much more detail than we can obtain by other methods and we can examine them more thoroughly without causing you discomfort.

They are also very useful for referral. If we see a problem we can send a copy of the photograph to the specialist so that they know exactly what we are concerned about.

Photographs allow us to show you what we are looking at. If we see a problem we can show you exactly what we are talking about and explain it properly rather than your imagination creating some horrible picture for you.

You can have a copy of the picture if you want one. We can email it to you for free (broadband only – they are very big files) or we can print it out for a small fee.

(16) Why do I need a copy of my prescription?

The simple answer is that we are required, by law, to give you a copy. A spectacle prescription is a medical document and should be kept in a safe place.

We can give you a second copy if you lose yours one but a charge may be made for this.

You are free to take your prescription to any optician to have your spectacles made up. You will also need it if you want contact lenses.

It is useful to carry with you if you go on holiday just in case you break your spectacles or lose a contact lens. Prescriptions are recognised world wide.

Old prescriptions provide a useful record of the changes that have occurred in your prescription. This is particularly useful if you move house and go to a new optometrist.

You may have to take your prescription with you if you have to go to hospital about your eyes.

(17) How often should I have my eyes tested?

That depends!

Everyone should have an eye examination at least every two years, even if you don’t need glasses.

If you are over 40 years of age and have a relative with glaucoma – every year

Under 16 years of age – at least once a year

Contact lens wearers – at least once a year

Your optometrist will tell you when your next examination is due. A number of factors will be taken into account when deciding the appropriate interval and you could be advised to come back be within 3 months or allowed to “escape” for as long as 2 years.

(18) I can see perfectly, why should I have my eyes tested?

An eye examination is not just a vision test. Eye tests save lives as well as sight!

There are a lot of conditions that can affect the eyes without causing noticeable sight loss.

An eye examination can also detect health problems such as high blood pressure, diabetes and even cancer.

Glaucoma is a condition that can cause devastating sight loss if it goes undetected, but the early signs of glaucoma happen so gradually that you might not notice them until it was too late. The damaged sight cannot be brought back.

You may not be able to see as well as you think you can! Long distance vision is very difficult to judge accurately and we frequently examine people who think they have good vision but who fail to meet the legal standard for driving.

(19) Why do my children need their eyes tested? They have an eye test at school don’t they?

Not all schools do eye tests now! Even those that do them only perform a very basic vision test. They do not check the health of the eyes or how well the eyes work as a pair.

Children grow very fast and their eyes can change quite a lot in 6 months so regular tests are needed. This is especially important if there is a family history of eye problems such as short sightedness.

A full eye examination will test the following:

Distance vision
Near vision
Colour Vision
Binocular Vision (How well the eyes work together as a pair)
Eye movements
Health of the eyes

Even if a child can see well in the distance they may have problems with close tasks. Any problem with reading can have a serious impact on a child’s ability to learn and uncorrected vision problems can even affect their behaviour.

Children do not always know that they cannot see properly as they have nothing to compare their vision to. We often see children who have poor vision in one eye but had no idea that this wasn’t normal!

A lazy eye that is treated before the age of 10 can often be corrected, giving useful vision in adult life. A lazy eye that goes undetected until the child becomes a teenager will, in most cases, always be a weaker eye. A lazy eye can have significant consequences for a child’s career.

(20) Why have I been told that I have dry eyes when they are watering all the time?

Why have I been told that I have dry eyes when they are watering all the time?

Dry eye is a very complex issue and the following is a somewhat simplified explanation.

Tears are there all the time and stop the eyes from drying out as well as protecting them from infection. If the tears are too watery to moisturise the eyes you get dry eyes and wet cheeks! Water is not a good moisturiser for the eye.

Healthy tears contain things called lipids and proteins, they are not just salt water. If you do not have the right balance of lipids in your tears the tears cannot do their job properly. This can result in soreness, a feeling of tiredness or blurry vision. The eye reacts by producing watery tears to “wash out” whatever is causing the soreness. This can create an endless cycle of discomfort and watering.

You can use artificial tears to try and break this cycle and retain a good healthy layer of tears. Recent research has shown that regular daily use of artificial tears is much more beneficial than just using them when you get symptoms. Prevention is better than cure!

If your eyes get to the watery stage they may have been drying out for some time. Prolonged dryness is not just uncomfortable, it can lead to permanent damage to the eye so is best avoided.

Many things can cause tear problems, the most common ones being age, hormonal changes and poor general health.

Your eyes need a good healthy layer of tears to protect them and to give good clear vision. Tear problems do not always cause discomfort, they can cause blurred or variable vision and this can vary from day to day.

You should always consult your optometrist if you have a sore, red or watery eye. There are many reasons why eyes water and delayed treatment could damage your eyes.

CONTACT LENSE FAQ - Answers

(1) I want contact lenses. Why do I need a different examination?

Although contact lenses are very liberating, and much more advanced now than they were even 5 years ago, they are still a foreign body in the eye and have the potential to cause harm if not fitted correctly.

A contact lens fitting covers a lot of aspects that are not relevant to a normal eye examination.

We will discuss exactly what you want lenses for, what you expect from them and how often you intend to wear them

We examine the front of the eye in much more detail for contact lenses than we do for spectacles.

We measure the shape of your eye to help decide which lenses will be most suitable and to make sure that lenses fit correctly

We check for scars or flaws in the cornea, conjunctive and eyelids that could be aggravated by lenses

We examine your tears to make sure that they will not be affected by the lenses and that they will cushion and moisturise the lenses properly

We try different lenses to determine the best lens for you and we check how these lenses are affecting your eye to make sure that they are unlikely to cause you any harm

We teach you how to insert and remove lenses and how to look after them

Contact lenses are not the same as spectacle lenses. If you have a strong prescription or astigmatism your contact lens specification could look completely different to your spectacle prescription.

(2) Why can’t I just buy lenses off the internet?

You could, BUT…………

Contact lenses are a foreign body in the eye and have the potential to cause great harm if not fitted correctly.

A contact lens specification is not the same as a spectacle prescription and not all contact lenses are suitable for all people. You need a full fitting before you can safely have lenses. The internet supplier may not provide any information on the correct cleaning solution for the lenses and will not teach you how to handle the lenses safely.

If you wear contact lenses and do not have regular aftercare appointments you risk permanent damage to your eyes. Early contact lens related problems do not always cause symptoms. Your eye care practitioner is trained to spot the early signs of problems and to deal with them before they cause damage or vision problems.

Once you have had a contact lens fitting you will be issued with a contact lens specification. You can use this to order lenses off the internet but remember that you will still have to pay for regular aftercare appointments with a qualified optometrist or contact lens practitioner. Make sure that your price comparison includes the cost of eye care and solution as well as lenses.

All internet suppliers are required by law to ensure that you have an up to date contact lens specification. If they do not ask you to provide this then they are breaking UK law and should not be considered to be a reputable company. They may also be supplying fake lenses which will not have been subjected to the same rigorous quality and safety tests as the genuine ones.

Not all contact lenses are the same, even if the numbers look the same. You will have been fitted with a lens specific to your requirements and a company offering substitute lenses cannot possibly know what will suit your eyes.

Watch out for expensive delivery charges and offers that look fantastic until you realise that you have to buy in bulk to get the advertised price.

Caveat Emptor!

(3) Can I wear my contact lenses in the swimming pool?

Swimming in lenses is not recommended either in the pool or in the sea.

Gas Permeable lenses can wash out and soft lenses will absorb water and all its associated bacteria.

If you are playing in a pool rather than serious swimming and really feel that you must wear lenses we would recommend that you wear daily disposable lenses and remove them as soon as you get out of the pool. This reduces the risk of infection as any harmful organisms that may have been absorbed into the lens do not have time to multiply or react with the eye.

If you are a serious swimmer then prescription swimming goggles are a safer option and are readily available.

(4) Can I sleep in my contact lenses?

That depends on the type of lens that you have been prescribed.

Daily disposable, standard monthly disposable and annual replacement soft contact lenses are not licensed for overnight wear and can cause damage to the eyes as they do not allow enough oxygen to the cornea.

If you want to be able to sleep in your lenses you need to be fitted with Silicone Hydrogel Lenses licensed for extended or continuous wear.

Some Gas Permeable lenses are suitable for over night wear. Discuss this with your optometrist or contact lens practitioner.

(5) Why can’t I use a cheaper contact lens solution from the supermarket?

Not all contact lens solutions are suitable for use with all lenses. You will have been prescribed the most suitable lens and solution combination for your eyes. Changing your solution without consulting your eye care practitioner is not recommended as the outcome cannot be predicted.

If you can buy your usual solution in the supermarket at a lower price then you can obviously do so. However, if your lenses come with solution as part of a monthly package you may find that you pay more in the supermarket.

(6) Why shouldn’t I use my friend’s coloured contact lenses?

Coloured contact lenses carry the same risks as prescription lenses. They are made of the same materials and need to be fitted properly in the same way that prescription lenses do.

You may not be suitable for contact lens wear and they could damage your eyes.

Contact lenses absorb contaminants from the tears. If you use someone else’s lenses you risk eye infections, or worse. HIV has been found in tears and could theoretically be transferred on a contact lens.

(7) My eyes are red, is it safe to put my lenses in?

NO!

You should never put a contact lens into a red eye.

If your eyes are red there is a reason for it, and sticking a foreign body in there could aggravate the situation and lead to permanent damage.

If you have a red eye you should consult your eye care practitioner as soon as possible.

If you are on EyeplanTM this emergency appointment will be free

SPECTACLE FAQ - Answers

(1) Can I have Reactolite lenses for driving?

Reactolite is a trade name for an obsolete brand of Photochromic lenses. These are lenses that change with the light.

Most Photochromic lenses do not react behind the windscreen of a car so they are not good as driving sunglasses. They are activated by UV light, which is blocked by glass windscreens. They are very good for outdoor activities and for people who work outside.

A new photochromic lens was launched in late 2006. The Nupolar Drivewear lens. This does change behind a windscreen but has a permanent tint so is not suitable as a general purpose lens. It is not legal for night driving.

(2) Why can’t I see TV in my reading glasses?

For the same reason that you can’t read in TV specs. The laws of physics mean that a lens has a limited range of focus. Reading glasses are focussed for close work and usually have a range that is within 50cm of your nose.

If you have specific reading spectacles it means that your eyes can no longer change focus from distance to near and you need an increase in positive lens power to allow you to read clearly and comfortably. This is called presbyopia.

If you want to be able to see to watch TV and read without changing your spectacles you need either a bifocal or a varifocal. If you do not need spectacles for distance you can have half-eye spectacles which you wear down your nose slightly so that you can look over the top of them for TV.

(3) Why can’t I read in my normal everyday glasses?

For the same reason that you can’t see TV in your reading glasses. The laws of physics mean that a lens has a limited range of focus. Your everyday glasses are focussed for long distance. Driving, TV, cinema, theatre etc.

If you can’t read in your everyday glasses it means that your eyes can no longer change focus from distance to near and you need an increase in positive lens power to allow you to read clearly and comfortably. This is called presbyopia.

If you want to be able to see in the distance and read without changing your spectacles you need either a bifocal or a varifocal.

(4) What are varifocal lenses?

Varifocal is another word for multifocal lenses. These are more properly called progressive addition lenses.

These lenses allow people with presbyopia to see clearly at all distances without the need to swap glasses. They are often described as “the bifocal without the line”. This is not quite accurate as they cover a far greater range than a bifocal and can be used for most purposes.

They are excellent lenses for general use but are not ideal for some sports or hobbies.

Some people find that it takes a few days to learn how to use their varifocal lenses properly. It is just like learning to use any new tool; some people will pick it up straight away, others will take a while to get the hang of it and a very small number of people will never quite manage it.

All varifocal lenses have an area of distortion at the edges. More modern designs have reduced this distortion quite considerably and there are many different manufacturers and designs available. You need to discuss your precise vision requirements with your practitioner to make sure that you get the best lens to suit your lifestyle.

In general, a cheaper lens will often have more peripheral distortion and may be more difficult to get used to. At the other end of the scale are lenses that are computer designed for the individual client from a series of measurements taken by the practitioner. There are a lot of lenses that fall somewhere between these two extremes and there should be one to suit you.

Frame choice and fitting are crucial to the success of varifocal wear. If your frame is bent or badly fitting then you will find that you get a narrow corridor of vision and your lenses are difficult to tolerate. If you have to move your head around to see clearly at specific distances then you need to have them adjusted. A minor adjustment to the fitting can make the difference between a lens that works for you and a lens that you cannot stand.

(5) What are bifocal lenses?

Bifocal lenses are lenses that have two distinct areas that are focussed at different distances. In most cases the top part of the lens is focussed for distance vision and the bottom part for close work.

The reading segment can be curved on the top (round segment) or flat on top (“D” segment). The shape of the reading area will be determined by your optometrist or dispenser.

We can create non standard bifocals that are for intermediate/near tasks or distance/intermediate tasks.

Intermediate / near bifocals are often used by office workers who need to see their computer screen at arms length but need a bit more strength in the lens to see small print on documents. They are no good for walking around or driving and are only really suitable if distance spectacles are not needed indoors.

Distance / Intermediate bifocals are great for LGV drivers or car drivers who need to see long distance to drive but need the mid range for dash instruments or satellite navigation systems. They are not much good for reading the A-Z.

If you need to see long distance, intermediate and close up without removing your glasses then you need to consider a varifocal lens.

(6)Why do I need reading glasses but not distance glasses?

This is a condition called presbyopia.

It happens to most people at around 40 years of age. It is caused by normal changes in the lens inside the eye and not, as is commonly thought, due to weakening muscles in the eye.

The lens inside the eye loses it’s flexibility with age and cannot change shape as easily as it did. This shape change is needed to change focus from long distance to close up. It is a gradual change and continues throughout life.

You may need to update your reading glasses quite regularly.

Your eyes will not get weaker because you start wearing reading glasses. The changes continue to occur as they did before you got the glasses.

Not wearing reading glasses when you need to will cause headaches, eyestrain and wrinkles but “putting it off” and “doing without them for as long as possible” will not prevent your presbyopia from increasing.

(7) Can I wear ready made reading glasses from the local shop?

If you have regular eye examinations to ensure that your eyes are healthy and your optometrist has said that your prescription is roughly equal in both eyes then, yes, you can safely wear “ready readers”.

You should NOT just use these spectacles in lieu of regular eye care. The eye examination is much more than just a test for spectacles, it is a health check as well. We have seen too many people who have put off having an eye exam until the ready readers didn’t work anymore, only to find that they have permanently lost their sight through a disease which would have been detected at a regular examination.

Some prescriptions are not adequately corrected by these “ready readers”. If you are moderately short sighted or have astigmatism then they will not work properly. They are also unlikely to be suitable if you are very long sighted.

They must not be worn for driving. If you find that your distance vision (driving or TV) is improved whilst wearing them then you probably need proper corrective lenses and should see an optometrist for a full eye examination.

(8) Why can’t I see the computer screen with my reading glasses?

For the same reason that you can’t read in TV specs or see TV in reading specs. The laws of physics mean that a lens has a limited range of focus. Reading glasses are focussed for close work and usually have a range that is within 50cm of your nose. Your computer screen will be beyond the range of your reading glasses. We call this the intermediate range.

The most appropriate correction to enable you to see your screen clearly and comfortably will depend on a combination of factors including the layout of your desk and workspace and the amount of time you spend using the computer.

You may need specific computer glasses, or you might be recommended a pair of bifocals or varifocals.